In this fifteenth post regarding my recap/review of James Dunn’s volume  Neither Jew nor Greek   I will attempt to summarize his 100+ page (!) research regarding how the second century Christians sources handled the oral traditions about Jesus. Needless to say, many of the finer details will have to pass in favor of a more general overview of what each writer had at their disposal, whether it be written documents, sayings committed to memory, or shorthand summaries of memorized verses. If you want the summary, scroll down to the TL;DR section.

Ignatius – Within the seven letters of Ignatius we can observe a few allusions to Jesus material (Dunn examines six examples). Each of the examples sampled from among Ignatius’s letters are attributed to quotations from memory rather than to copying from a written text. It could be that the various quotes were from certain Jesus sayings which were circulating orally. We should, however, remember that these documents were written on the road to Ignatius’s martyrdom, and it is hardly likely that he would have had in his possession the actual copies of the four Gospels during his Roman custody.

The Shepherd of Hermas –  Somewhat disappointing, The Shepherd  makes no explicit reference to any of the NT Gospels (or any of Paul’s letters for that matter). Within the  Similitudes  and the  Mandates  are some allusions to Jesus traditions, but Dunn suggests that these are best explained as examples of how language and themes have become a part of the regular vocabulary and motifs used by early Christian teachers.

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

THE EPISTLES OF CLEMENT OF ROME:
The genuine epistle: Introduction | 1 Clement - : text & translation |
An ancient Homily commonly called 2 Clement: Introduction | text & translation |

THE EPISTLES OF IGNATIUS | Introduction | Epistle to the Ephesians | Magnesians | Trallians | Romans | Philadelphians | Smyrnaeans || to Polycarp |

THE SHEPHERD OF HERMAS | introduction | text & translation: 1. the visions | 2. the mandates | 3. the parables .

Uploaded by [email protected] on September 18, 2008

In this fifteenth post regarding my recap/review of James Dunn’s volume  Neither Jew nor Greek   I will attempt to summarize his 100+ page (!) research regarding how the second century Christians sources handled the oral traditions about Jesus. Needless to say, many of the finer details will have to pass in favor of a more general overview of what each writer had at their disposal, whether it be written documents, sayings committed to memory, or shorthand summaries of memorized verses. If you want the summary, scroll down to the TL;DR section.

Ignatius – Within the seven letters of Ignatius we can observe a few allusions to Jesus material (Dunn examines six examples). Each of the examples sampled from among Ignatius’s letters are attributed to quotations from memory rather than to copying from a written text. It could be that the various quotes were from certain Jesus sayings which were circulating orally. We should, however, remember that these documents were written on the road to Ignatius’s martyrdom, and it is hardly likely that he would have had in his possession the actual copies of the four Gospels during his Roman custody.

The Shepherd of Hermas –  Somewhat disappointing, The Shepherd  makes no explicit reference to any of the NT Gospels (or any of Paul’s letters for that matter). Within the  Similitudes  and the  Mandates  are some allusions to Jesus traditions, but Dunn suggests that these are best explained as examples of how language and themes have become a part of the regular vocabulary and motifs used by early Christian teachers.

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

THE EPISTLES OF CLEMENT OF ROME:
The genuine epistle: Introduction | 1 Clement - : text & translation |
An ancient Homily commonly called 2 Clement: Introduction | text & translation |

THE EPISTLES OF IGNATIUS | Introduction | Epistle to the Ephesians | Magnesians | Trallians | Romans | Philadelphians | Smyrnaeans || to Polycarp |

THE SHEPHERD OF HERMAS | introduction | text & translation: 1. the visions | 2. the mandates | 3. the parables .

Uploaded by [email protected] on September 18, 2008

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In this fifteenth post regarding my recap/review of James Dunn’s volume  Neither Jew nor Greek   I will attempt to summarize his 100+ page (!) research regarding how the second century Christians sources handled the oral traditions about Jesus. Needless to say, many of the finer details will have to pass in favor of a more general overview of what each writer had at their disposal, whether it be written documents, sayings committed to memory, or shorthand summaries of memorized verses. If you want the summary, scroll down to the TL;DR section.

Ignatius – Within the seven letters of Ignatius we can observe a few allusions to Jesus material (Dunn examines six examples). Each of the examples sampled from among Ignatius’s letters are attributed to quotations from memory rather than to copying from a written text. It could be that the various quotes were from certain Jesus sayings which were circulating orally. We should, however, remember that these documents were written on the road to Ignatius’s martyrdom, and it is hardly likely that he would have had in his possession the actual copies of the four Gospels during his Roman custody.

The Shepherd of Hermas –  Somewhat disappointing, The Shepherd  makes no explicit reference to any of the NT Gospels (or any of Paul’s letters for that matter). Within the  Similitudes  and the  Mandates  are some allusions to Jesus traditions, but Dunn suggests that these are best explained as examples of how language and themes have become a part of the regular vocabulary and motifs used by early Christian teachers.

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

THE EPISTLES OF CLEMENT OF ROME:
The genuine epistle: Introduction | 1 Clement - : text & translation |
An ancient Homily commonly called 2 Clement: Introduction | text & translation |

THE EPISTLES OF IGNATIUS | Introduction | Epistle to the Ephesians | Magnesians | Trallians | Romans | Philadelphians | Smyrnaeans || to Polycarp |

THE SHEPHERD OF HERMAS | introduction | text & translation: 1. the visions | 2. the mandates | 3. the parables .

In this fifteenth post regarding my recap/review of James Dunn’s volume  Neither Jew nor Greek   I will attempt to summarize his 100+ page (!) research regarding how the second century Christians sources handled the oral traditions about Jesus. Needless to say, many of the finer details will have to pass in favor of a more general overview of what each writer had at their disposal, whether it be written documents, sayings committed to memory, or shorthand summaries of memorized verses. If you want the summary, scroll down to the TL;DR section.

Ignatius – Within the seven letters of Ignatius we can observe a few allusions to Jesus material (Dunn examines six examples). Each of the examples sampled from among Ignatius’s letters are attributed to quotations from memory rather than to copying from a written text. It could be that the various quotes were from certain Jesus sayings which were circulating orally. We should, however, remember that these documents were written on the road to Ignatius’s martyrdom, and it is hardly likely that he would have had in his possession the actual copies of the four Gospels during his Roman custody.

The Shepherd of Hermas –  Somewhat disappointing, The Shepherd  makes no explicit reference to any of the NT Gospels (or any of Paul’s letters for that matter). Within the  Similitudes  and the  Mandates  are some allusions to Jesus traditions, but Dunn suggests that these are best explained as examples of how language and themes have become a part of the regular vocabulary and motifs used by early Christian teachers.

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

In this fifteenth post regarding my recap/review of James Dunn’s volume  Neither Jew nor Greek   I will attempt to summarize his 100+ page (!) research regarding how the second century Christians sources handled the oral traditions about Jesus. Needless to say, many of the finer details will have to pass in favor of a more general overview of what each writer had at their disposal, whether it be written documents, sayings committed to memory, or shorthand summaries of memorized verses. If you want the summary, scroll down to the TL;DR section.

Ignatius – Within the seven letters of Ignatius we can observe a few allusions to Jesus material (Dunn examines six examples). Each of the examples sampled from among Ignatius’s letters are attributed to quotations from memory rather than to copying from a written text. It could be that the various quotes were from certain Jesus sayings which were circulating orally. We should, however, remember that these documents were written on the road to Ignatius’s martyrdom, and it is hardly likely that he would have had in his possession the actual copies of the four Gospels during his Roman custody.

The Shepherd of Hermas –  Somewhat disappointing, The Shepherd  makes no explicit reference to any of the NT Gospels (or any of Paul’s letters for that matter). Within the  Similitudes  and the  Mandates  are some allusions to Jesus traditions, but Dunn suggests that these are best explained as examples of how language and themes have become a part of the regular vocabulary and motifs used by early Christian teachers.

Apostolic Fathers - YouTube


CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The Apostolic Fathers

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