In 2015, New England Wild Flower Society released the State of New England's Native Plants report, the most comprehensive assessment of New England plant communities ever assembled. This peer-reviewed report:

The report draws on hundreds of studies of New England plant communities and the fieldwork of more than 700 volunteers and professional botanists across the region. It brings together the expertise of leading botanical researchers and members of the 60 partner organizations in the Society’s  New England Plant Conservation Program , and was peer reviewed by experts in Natural Heritage programs across New England.

Plants are the basis of all life on the planet . Each native plant species supports insects, birds, animals, and other plants and microorganisms, and relies on them, in turn, for survival. The loss of a single plant species can lead to the collapse of related plant and animal species. In New England, where 593 species are now listed as rare or possibly extinct, it is vitally important to understand and protect our native plants.

In 2015, New England Wild Flower Society released the State of New England's Native Plants report, the most comprehensive assessment of New England plant communities ever assembled. This peer-reviewed report:

The report draws on hundreds of studies of New England plant communities and the fieldwork of more than 700 volunteers and professional botanists across the region. It brings together the expertise of leading botanical researchers and members of the 60 partner organizations in the Society’s  New England Plant Conservation Program , and was peer reviewed by experts in Natural Heritage programs across New England.

Plants are the basis of all life on the planet . Each native plant species supports insects, birds, animals, and other plants and microorganisms, and relies on them, in turn, for survival. The loss of a single plant species can lead to the collapse of related plant and animal species. In New England, where 593 species are now listed as rare or possibly extinct, it is vitally important to understand and protect our native plants.

The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. Its goal is to eliminate the need for repeated reference to primary sources for basic bibliographic information about plant names. The data are freely available and are gradually being standardized and checked. IPNI is a dynamic resource, depending on direct contributions by all members of the botanical community.

IPNI is the product of a collaboration between The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , The Harvard University Herbaria , and the Australian National Herbarium .

From 1 January 2012 electronic material published online in Portable Document Format ( PDF ) with an International Standard Serial Number ( ISSN ) or an International Standard Book Number ( ISBN ) constitutes effective publication.

We want to make sure that IPNI captures all relevant nomenclatural novelties, whether published online or in printed form.

IPNI users can help. Let us know if you publish or find names in an online publication by sending us a link to the relevant site.

Middle English, from Old English plantian , from Late Latin plantare to plant, fix in place, from Latin, to plant, from planta plant

In 2015, New England Wild Flower Society released the State of New England's Native Plants report, the most comprehensive assessment of New England plant communities ever assembled. This peer-reviewed report:

The report draws on hundreds of studies of New England plant communities and the fieldwork of more than 700 volunteers and professional botanists across the region. It brings together the expertise of leading botanical researchers and members of the 60 partner organizations in the Society’s  New England Plant Conservation Program , and was peer reviewed by experts in Natural Heritage programs across New England.

Plants are the basis of all life on the planet . Each native plant species supports insects, birds, animals, and other plants and microorganisms, and relies on them, in turn, for survival. The loss of a single plant species can lead to the collapse of related plant and animal species. In New England, where 593 species are now listed as rare or possibly extinct, it is vitally important to understand and protect our native plants.

The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. Its goal is to eliminate the need for repeated reference to primary sources for basic bibliographic information about plant names. The data are freely available and are gradually being standardized and checked. IPNI is a dynamic resource, depending on direct contributions by all members of the botanical community.

IPNI is the product of a collaboration between The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , The Harvard University Herbaria , and the Australian National Herbarium .

From 1 January 2012 electronic material published online in Portable Document Format ( PDF ) with an International Standard Serial Number ( ISSN ) or an International Standard Book Number ( ISBN ) constitutes effective publication.

We want to make sure that IPNI captures all relevant nomenclatural novelties, whether published online or in printed form.

IPNI users can help. Let us know if you publish or find names in an online publication by sending us a link to the relevant site.

In 2015, New England Wild Flower Society released the State of New England's Native Plants report, the most comprehensive assessment of New England plant communities ever assembled. This peer-reviewed report:

The report draws on hundreds of studies of New England plant communities and the fieldwork of more than 700 volunteers and professional botanists across the region. It brings together the expertise of leading botanical researchers and members of the 60 partner organizations in the Society’s  New England Plant Conservation Program , and was peer reviewed by experts in Natural Heritage programs across New England.

Plants are the basis of all life on the planet . Each native plant species supports insects, birds, animals, and other plants and microorganisms, and relies on them, in turn, for survival. The loss of a single plant species can lead to the collapse of related plant and animal species. In New England, where 593 species are now listed as rare or possibly extinct, it is vitally important to understand and protect our native plants.

The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. Its goal is to eliminate the need for repeated reference to primary sources for basic bibliographic information about plant names. The data are freely available and are gradually being standardized and checked. IPNI is a dynamic resource, depending on direct contributions by all members of the botanical community.

IPNI is the product of a collaboration between The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , The Harvard University Herbaria , and the Australian National Herbarium .

From 1 January 2012 electronic material published online in Portable Document Format ( PDF ) with an International Standard Serial Number ( ISSN ) or an International Standard Book Number ( ISBN ) constitutes effective publication.

We want to make sure that IPNI captures all relevant nomenclatural novelties, whether published online or in printed form.

IPNI users can help. Let us know if you publish or find names in an online publication by sending us a link to the relevant site.

Middle English, from Old English plantian , from Late Latin plantare to plant, fix in place, from Latin, to plant, from planta plant

Definition. Plants are one of the two groups into which all living things were traditionally divided; the other is animals. The division goes back at least as far as ...

Plants are one of five big groups of living things. They are autotrophic eukaryotes, which means they have complex cells, and make their own food.

The flowering plants , also known as angiosperms, Angiospermae or Magnoliophyta, are the most diverse group of land plants , with 416 families, approximately 13,164 ...

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