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Towel Day is celebrated every year on 25 May as a tribute to the author Douglas Adams by his fans. [1] On this day, fans openly carry a towel with them, as described in Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or share their folded animal towels [2] to demonstrate their appreciation for the books and the author. The commemoration was first held 25 May 2001, two weeks after Adams' death on 11 May. [3]

The importance of the towel was introduced in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy original radio series in 1978. The follow-up book explained the importance of towels in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe in Chapter 3, using much of the same wording as the original radio series:

The original article that began Towel Day was posted by a user "Clyde" (probably D. Clyde Williamson [5] ) at "System Toolbox", a short-lived open source forum. [6]

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Towel Day is celebrated every year on 25 May as a tribute to the author Douglas Adams by his fans. [1] On this day, fans openly carry a towel with them, as described in Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or share their folded animal towels [2] to demonstrate their appreciation for the books and the author. The commemoration was first held 25 May 2001, two weeks after Adams' death on 11 May. [3]

The importance of the towel was introduced in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy original radio series in 1978. The follow-up book explained the importance of towels in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe in Chapter 3, using much of the same wording as the original radio series:

The original article that began Towel Day was posted by a user "Clyde" (probably D. Clyde Williamson [5] ) at "System Toolbox", a short-lived open source forum. [6]

The name? Well, if you use a 150 g skein of Wollmeise 100% Merino for this, you can make how many teeth? That‘s right, 42. The answer to the question about the universe and everything, according to Douglas Adams‘ wonderful book „The Hitchhiker‘s Guide to the Galaxy“. So don‘t forget your towel, and happy knitting!

Please note:
When you buy this pattern, you will receive an automated e-mail containing the download link for the PDF. When you click it, a little window opens up and all language version of that pattern appear for you to choose from. The English version ends ENGLISH.pdf. Also, all language versions are automatically added to your Ravelry library.

Der Name? Nun, wenn man einen 150-Gramm-Strang Wollmeise 100% Merino dafür nimmt, kann man genau wie viele Zacken stricken? 42. Die Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Universum und dem ganzen Rest, jedenfalls wenn es nach Douglas Adams‘ großartigem Buch „Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis“ („The Hitchhikers‘ Guide to the Galaxy“) geht. Also: Vergesst Eure Handtücher nicht. Und viel Spaß beim Stricken!

A newlywed couple, Nathan and Heather, were driving up the northern California coast to spend their dream honeymoon in a quaint bed-and-breakfast with a seaside view. They had hoped to arrive before dark, but a heavy fog had descended on Highway 1 and their progress was slow. They were at least an hour-an-a-half from their destination as night fell.

If you've ever driven that stretch of highway you know how tortuous it can be, with its narrow lanes and switchback curves. It was just as they were rounding one of those curves that they passed a solitary hitchhiker, a young woman in a wispy white dress standing on the shoulder with thumb outstretched.

Nathan pulled off the road and turned around. As they approached the girl from the opposite direction they could see her dress was in tatters. Her face was pale and gaunt.

Douglas Adams, the author of the cult radio play and novel The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy , wrote that the answer to ‘the ultimate question of the meaning of life, the universe and everything’ is 42. Writer Alan Stokes discusses this seeming joke in his Sydney Morning Herald article entitled ‘At sixes and sevens: Douglas Adams and why life begins at 42’.

Since the publication of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy , speculation has been rife about why Adams chose this number. Before he died at age 49, Douglas Adams admitted that his answer of 42 was a complete nonsense – a made-up number with no particular relevance.

 Unbelievably however, recent research has brought the number back into focus. Melbourne University researcher Terence Cheng and his colleagues from the London School of Economics & Political Science and the University of Warwick analysed the ‘within person’ wellbeing of more than 350,000 Australians, Britons and Germans over a nine to 17 year period. They concluded that happiness, indeed, does decline from age 18 and reaches its nadir (for Australians) at age 40. Alan Stokes argues that this is the classic age of the mid-life crisis, which is likely to finish at – wait for it – age 42.

“`Space,' it says, `is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist’s, but that’s just peanuts to space.'”

The guide that gives The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is very much a character in the book. This no ordinary guide, but an e-guide. In fact, if you think about the Hitchhiker’s Guide as the unacknowledged birth father of Wikipedia, you get a fairly accurate read on how it is written as well as how it is used by the character. This description of space is, for instance, just one of the many brilliantly dry and ironic descriptions to be found throughout the book. To get the full effect, of course, it helps to imagine Stephen Fry reading all passages from the Guide.

"Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea."

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Towel Day is celebrated every year on 25 May as a tribute to the author Douglas Adams by his fans. [1] On this day, fans openly carry a towel with them, as described in Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or share their folded animal towels [2] to demonstrate their appreciation for the books and the author. The commemoration was first held 25 May 2001, two weeks after Adams' death on 11 May. [3]

The importance of the towel was introduced in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy original radio series in 1978. The follow-up book explained the importance of towels in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe in Chapter 3, using much of the same wording as the original radio series:

The original article that began Towel Day was posted by a user "Clyde" (probably D. Clyde Williamson [5] ) at "System Toolbox", a short-lived open source forum. [6]

The name? Well, if you use a 150 g skein of Wollmeise 100% Merino for this, you can make how many teeth? That‘s right, 42. The answer to the question about the universe and everything, according to Douglas Adams‘ wonderful book „The Hitchhiker‘s Guide to the Galaxy“. So don‘t forget your towel, and happy knitting!

Please note:
When you buy this pattern, you will receive an automated e-mail containing the download link for the PDF. When you click it, a little window opens up and all language version of that pattern appear for you to choose from. The English version ends ENGLISH.pdf. Also, all language versions are automatically added to your Ravelry library.

Der Name? Nun, wenn man einen 150-Gramm-Strang Wollmeise 100% Merino dafür nimmt, kann man genau wie viele Zacken stricken? 42. Die Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Universum und dem ganzen Rest, jedenfalls wenn es nach Douglas Adams‘ großartigem Buch „Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis“ („The Hitchhikers‘ Guide to the Galaxy“) geht. Also: Vergesst Eure Handtücher nicht. Und viel Spaß beim Stricken!

A newlywed couple, Nathan and Heather, were driving up the northern California coast to spend their dream honeymoon in a quaint bed-and-breakfast with a seaside view. They had hoped to arrive before dark, but a heavy fog had descended on Highway 1 and their progress was slow. They were at least an hour-an-a-half from their destination as night fell.

If you've ever driven that stretch of highway you know how tortuous it can be, with its narrow lanes and switchback curves. It was just as they were rounding one of those curves that they passed a solitary hitchhiker, a young woman in a wispy white dress standing on the shoulder with thumb outstretched.

Nathan pulled off the road and turned around. As they approached the girl from the opposite direction they could see her dress was in tatters. Her face was pale and gaunt.

Douglas Adams, the author of the cult radio play and novel The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy , wrote that the answer to ‘the ultimate question of the meaning of life, the universe and everything’ is 42. Writer Alan Stokes discusses this seeming joke in his Sydney Morning Herald article entitled ‘At sixes and sevens: Douglas Adams and why life begins at 42’.

Since the publication of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy , speculation has been rife about why Adams chose this number. Before he died at age 49, Douglas Adams admitted that his answer of 42 was a complete nonsense – a made-up number with no particular relevance.

 Unbelievably however, recent research has brought the number back into focus. Melbourne University researcher Terence Cheng and his colleagues from the London School of Economics & Political Science and the University of Warwick analysed the ‘within person’ wellbeing of more than 350,000 Australians, Britons and Germans over a nine to 17 year period. They concluded that happiness, indeed, does decline from age 18 and reaches its nadir (for Australians) at age 40. Alan Stokes argues that this is the classic age of the mid-life crisis, which is likely to finish at – wait for it – age 42.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Towel Day is celebrated every year on 25 May as a tribute to the author Douglas Adams by his fans. [1] On this day, fans openly carry a towel with them, as described in Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or share their folded animal towels [2] to demonstrate their appreciation for the books and the author. The commemoration was first held 25 May 2001, two weeks after Adams' death on 11 May. [3]

The importance of the towel was introduced in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy original radio series in 1978. The follow-up book explained the importance of towels in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe in Chapter 3, using much of the same wording as the original radio series:

The original article that began Towel Day was posted by a user "Clyde" (probably D. Clyde Williamson [5] ) at "System Toolbox", a short-lived open source forum. [6]

The name? Well, if you use a 150 g skein of Wollmeise 100% Merino for this, you can make how many teeth? That‘s right, 42. The answer to the question about the universe and everything, according to Douglas Adams‘ wonderful book „The Hitchhiker‘s Guide to the Galaxy“. So don‘t forget your towel, and happy knitting!

Please note:
When you buy this pattern, you will receive an automated e-mail containing the download link for the PDF. When you click it, a little window opens up and all language version of that pattern appear for you to choose from. The English version ends ENGLISH.pdf. Also, all language versions are automatically added to your Ravelry library.

Der Name? Nun, wenn man einen 150-Gramm-Strang Wollmeise 100% Merino dafür nimmt, kann man genau wie viele Zacken stricken? 42. Die Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Universum und dem ganzen Rest, jedenfalls wenn es nach Douglas Adams‘ großartigem Buch „Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis“ („The Hitchhikers‘ Guide to the Galaxy“) geht. Also: Vergesst Eure Handtücher nicht. Und viel Spaß beim Stricken!

A newlywed couple, Nathan and Heather, were driving up the northern California coast to spend their dream honeymoon in a quaint bed-and-breakfast with a seaside view. They had hoped to arrive before dark, but a heavy fog had descended on Highway 1 and their progress was slow. They were at least an hour-an-a-half from their destination as night fell.

If you've ever driven that stretch of highway you know how tortuous it can be, with its narrow lanes and switchback curves. It was just as they were rounding one of those curves that they passed a solitary hitchhiker, a young woman in a wispy white dress standing on the shoulder with thumb outstretched.

Nathan pulled off the road and turned around. As they approached the girl from the opposite direction they could see her dress was in tatters. Her face was pale and gaunt.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Towel Day is celebrated every year on 25 May as a tribute to the author Douglas Adams by his fans. [1] On this day, fans openly carry a towel with them, as described in Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy or share their folded animal towels [2] to demonstrate their appreciation for the books and the author. The commemoration was first held 25 May 2001, two weeks after Adams' death on 11 May. [3]

The importance of the towel was introduced in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy original radio series in 1978. The follow-up book explained the importance of towels in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe in Chapter 3, using much of the same wording as the original radio series:

The original article that began Towel Day was posted by a user "Clyde" (probably D. Clyde Williamson [5] ) at "System Toolbox", a short-lived open source forum. [6]

The name? Well, if you use a 150 g skein of Wollmeise 100% Merino for this, you can make how many teeth? That‘s right, 42. The answer to the question about the universe and everything, according to Douglas Adams‘ wonderful book „The Hitchhiker‘s Guide to the Galaxy“. So don‘t forget your towel, and happy knitting!

Please note:
When you buy this pattern, you will receive an automated e-mail containing the download link for the PDF. When you click it, a little window opens up and all language version of that pattern appear for you to choose from. The English version ends ENGLISH.pdf. Also, all language versions are automatically added to your Ravelry library.

Der Name? Nun, wenn man einen 150-Gramm-Strang Wollmeise 100% Merino dafür nimmt, kann man genau wie viele Zacken stricken? 42. Die Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Universum und dem ganzen Rest, jedenfalls wenn es nach Douglas Adams‘ großartigem Buch „Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis“ („The Hitchhikers‘ Guide to the Galaxy“) geht. Also: Vergesst Eure Handtücher nicht. Und viel Spaß beim Stricken!

List of minor The Hitchhiker s Guide to the Galaxy characters


Towel Day - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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