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The dialogue is unusual in being one of three that do not feature Socrates , although as in its sequel, the Statesman , he is present to play a minor role (the other dialogue is the Laws ). Instead, the Eleatic Stranger takes the lead in the discussion. The fact that Socrates is present but silent makes it difficult to attribute the views put forward by the Eleatic Stranger to Plato, beyond the difficulty inherent in taking any character to be an author's "mouthpiece."

This dialogue takes place a day after Plato's Theaetetus , and aims at defining the sophist. The participants are Socrates , who plays a minor role, a young mathematician, Theaetetus , and a visitor from Elea , the hometown of Parmenides .

After the verbal explanation of the model (definition), he tries to find out what the model and the target kind share in common (sameness) and what differentiates them (difference). Through this comparison, and after having been aware of the different kinds and sub-kinds, he can classify sophistry also among the other branches of the ‘tree’ of division of expertise as follows: "1. production, hunting by persuasion and money-earning, 2.acquisition, soul wholesaling, 3. soul retailing, retailing things that others make, 4. soul retailing, retailing things that he makes himself, 5. possession taking, competition, money-making expertise in debating."

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

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The dialogue is unusual in being one of three that do not feature Socrates , although as in its sequel, the Statesman , he is present to play a minor role (the other dialogue is the Laws ). Instead, the Eleatic Stranger takes the lead in the discussion. The fact that Socrates is present but silent makes it difficult to attribute the views put forward by the Eleatic Stranger to Plato, beyond the difficulty inherent in taking any character to be an author's "mouthpiece."

This dialogue takes place a day after Plato's Theaetetus , and aims at defining the sophist. The participants are Socrates , who plays a minor role, a young mathematician, Theaetetus , and a visitor from Elea , the hometown of Parmenides .

After the verbal explanation of the model (definition), he tries to find out what the model and the target kind share in common (sameness) and what differentiates them (difference). Through this comparison, and after having been aware of the different kinds and sub-kinds, he can classify sophistry also among the other branches of the ‘tree’ of division of expertise as follows: "1. production, hunting by persuasion and money-earning, 2.acquisition, soul wholesaling, 3. soul retailing, retailing things that others make, 4. soul retailing, retailing things that he makes himself, 5. possession taking, competition, money-making expertise in debating."

A sophist ( Greek : σοφιστής , sophistes) was a specific kind of teacher in Ancient Greece , in the fifth and fourth centuries BC. Many sophists specialized in using the tools of philosophy and rhetoric , though other sophists taught subjects such as music, athletics, and mathematics. In general, they claimed to teach arete ("excellence" or "virtue", applied to various subject areas), predominantly to young statesmen and nobility.

The term originated from Greek σόφισμα, sophisma , from σοφίζω, sophizo "I am wise"; confer σοφιστής, sophistēs , meaning "wise-ist, one who does wisdom ," and σοφός, sophós means "wise man".

From the word σοφός ( sophos ) is derived the verb σοφίζω ( sophizo ), which means "to instruct or make learned", but which in the passive voice means "to become or be wise", or "to be clever or skilled in a thing". In turn, from this verb is derived the noun σοφιστής ( sophistes ), which originally meant "a master of one's craft" but later came to mean "a prudent man" or "wise man". [4] The word for "sophist" in various languages comes from sophistes .

Sophist | philosophy | Britannica.com


Sophist (dialogue) - Wikipedia

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